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The NAQCC February 2018 Challenge

All challenge info such as rules are now in the hands of Gary K1YAN. Email him with any questions in that regard at pix_email_k1yan (1K).

The results on this page are the responsibility of Hap K7HAP. Email him with any questions in that regard at pix_email_k7hap (1K).


FOR YOUR EYES ONLY

PREMISE:
If you want to send a very private message by a very public medium, such as radio, you encrypt it. There are many schemes for doing this manually, but they are not as secure as you want them to be. It is before the computer age, so, no help there. What do you do? Edward Hebern was a building contractor, who, in 1908, found himself in jail after a horse theft gone wrong. With a lot of time on his hands, he began thinking about the problem of encryption and eventually came up with a mechanical system utilizing a typewriter. He filed his first patent in 1912. Further work resulted in a rotor based system which he patented in 1918. In this type of system one or more metal disks or rotors, with electrical contacts, are used to link an electrical character input to a random character electrical output. The rotor turns after each character to change the encoding and provide an encrypted text. Several rotors can be used in series to further randomize the text. Inputting the encrypted text to a similar, properly configured system, can decode the text. Hebern’s work inspired other rotor machine designs. These machines became the primary encryption systems for WW II and saw use into the cold war era. Perhaps the most famous of these was the WW II, German, Enigma system. There were, however, many others, including the US M-325, the Russian Fialka and the CCM ( combined cipher machine ) a British, American WW II collaboration, to name a few. Most of these systems found use in military or diplomatic areas. Although they were the cutting edge technology of the day, several systems were found to have flaws and some were too easily compromised. The birth of the computer allowed better, faster and more secure encryption and ended the use of the rotor machine.


TIME FRAME:
The first day of the month 0000Z through the last day of the month 2400Z


RULES:
Just make ALL these words from calls of stations you work subject to the General Challenge Rules. (Any spaces in the phrases should be ignored. For example the challenge phrase "INVERTED V ANTENNA" should be treated as if it is the single word "INVERTEDVANTENNA.")

EDWARD HEBERN
ROTOR ENCRYPTION SYSTEM
GERMAN ENIGMA
COMBINED CIPHER MACHINE
US M-325
RUSSIAN FIALKA

The 85 total letters contain these 24 different letters and numbers : A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P R S T U W Y 3 2 5

You can use each letter in a call TWICE. For example you could use K3WWP for 2 K's, 4 W's, and 2 P's.

Subsequent QSO's with the same station cannot be used for additional letters. For example, no matter how many times you work K3WWP, you can only use his call for 8 of the letters in the words.

See General Rule #5 for more details on what callsign letters can be used.

If you need some help with your alphabet challenge record keeping take a look at our Alphabet Tutorial page for everything from some great pencil & paper methods to fully computerized tools.


AWARDS:
A certificate and Participation Point go to everyone making all the words and submitting their report before the deadline.

A Participation Point goes to everyone making at least 1, but not all the words and submitting their report before the deadline.


PRIZES:
A choice of an item made by master woodworker Gregg WB8LZG as shown on our prizes page here goes to someone selected via a random drawing from all who participate and submit a report for this month's challenge. A person can only win once, then they become ineligible for future drawings.


LOGS:
For your report, list the words you made and the station used for each letter in the word. The number of stations listed must be the same as the number of letters in each word, even though you use the same station for more than one letter as in:

WORD - K3WWP N2OD WA8REI N2OD
NEXT - NF8M W8REI N8XMS K9EYT

(Note how N2OD is listed for both the O and D.)

You may also include comments about the challenge. Please preface any comments you want posted with "SOAPBOX:" so we will know what you want posted and what is private.

Send your results as text in the horizontal format shown above to:

E-mail: pix_email_k7hap (1K) (You must type that address into your email program.)
Subject must read: (your call) NAQCC (month) Challenge
For example: K3WWP NAQCC February Challenge

All entries must be RECEIVED before the 10th of the following month at 2400Z.


Results:

 
All the above get a certificate and participation point.

All below get only a participation point.

 
Soapbox: